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Steel Your Favourite Flora!

Steel Your Favourite Flora!

With these steel framed greenhouses, it doesn’t matter if the flowers you love can’t grow in your local climates. A little technological ingenuity backed up with some engineering excellence, ensure you can have beautiful blooms in your home all year through.

Greenhouses have long been favoured by those who aren’t too happy with allowing small inconveniences like unsuitable weather, preventing them from being able to raise and enjoy flowers and other flora of their choice. Having a privately owned greenhouse used to be a luxury that not many could afford before. But with new technological advances and better equipment, it is more accessible than ever.

For instance, at Oasis Metals, we custom make shaped gratings to your specifications to suit a wide range of requirements. If a greenhouse is what you’d like to construct, then we can fulfil all your needs.

We are happy to work with your designers for a business like a nursery or a florist, where you might need a larger greenhouse, or multiple facilities with different requirements for each one, depending on the varieties of the plants one wants to cultivate.

Our sales team would be happy to work with you to make sure that we cover all the bases of your needs.

Whether you have a home with sprawling grounds, or a small backyard that you’d like to use, we can easily provide you with the products you will need for the frame and support work.

The steel framework is sturdy enough to survive the wear and tear of a low maintenance house schedule.

It is also much more resistant to the elements than other materials and therefore lasts much longer. This translates to your money spent being an investment rather than an expense.

Most greenhouses are a frame that is then covered by a material that allows sunlight through, but contains the warmth it brings. Of course, the reverse is also true where the glass or roofing will allow the sunlight through but keep the interior at a lower temperature than the scorching ones we experience in the desert during the day. A greenhouse is meant to regulate the temperature within the structure to keep it at a regulated steady one. Sudden fluctuations could lead to the plants being destroyed, or adversely affected by the extremes of hot and cold.

It does all this while also protecting the plants inside from too much or not enough rain and other weather conditions out of our control.

The variety of greenhouses can differ from a simple roof structure to one that is temperature controlled on the inside with automated sprinklers and humidity controllers. Let Oasis Metals help you build your dream garden. Call us to know more!

 

Sydney Harbour Bridge

Sydney Harbour Bridge

52,800 tonnes of steel. 6,000,000 steel rivets. Approximately 1000 metres long. An iconic sight, and a landmark recognized around the globe. Welcome to the Sydney Harbour Bridge.

According to the information maintained by the Australian Government, the suggestion for a bridge allowing commuters to bypass the busy Harbour area, was first made all the way back in 1815 by Francis Greenway. Of course, it took years before that dream could be realized.

The local governing bodies invited design submissions in 1900, but it would take years for one to be approved and the tender floated.

Sydney had to wait until after the end of the First World War, for more serious plans to come to fruition. A general design for the proposed bridge was prepared by Dr. J J C Bradfield, and officers of the NSW Department of Public Works. The state government then invited tenders from around the world, with the final contract being awarded to the English firm,  Dorman Long and Co of Middlesbrough.

Construction on the “Sydney Harbour Bridge” began in 1924. It would take 1400 men, 8 years, 6 million hand driven rivets, and about 53,000 tons of steel to build the edifice that stands as a symbol for the city today. It cost the government 4.2 million dollars to construct. The bridge now has 8 traffic lanes, 2 of which used to be tram tracks before the trams were decommissioned in the 1950s. There are also 2 rail lines on the bridge, one in each direction.

Inaugurated on the 19th of March, 1932, by the NSW Premier, the Honourable John ‘Jack’ T. Lang, the bridge has since seen millions of vehicles, trains and foot traffic.

A huge tourist attraction – BridgeClimb, started in 1998, pulling in tourists and locals alike. It allows climbers to ascend the catwalks on the bridge all the way to the top. The universal opinion is that the spectacular view is worth the climb up ladders and stairs. The climbs are scheduled throughout the day, during twilight and at night as well. Understandably, safety precautions are detailed, including a blood alcohol reading and a climb simulator, which helps climbers anticipate the conditions they are about to experience.
By all accounts, the BridgeClimb is breath-taking, and is always listed as a must-do for visitors to Sydney. Royals like Prince Frederik and Princess Mary of Denmark, and celebrities like Matt Damon, Hugo Weaving, Sarah Ferguson, Cathy Freeman, Kylie Minogue and Kostya Tszyu all having done the Climb.

Almost all the components for the construction of this bridge were custom made, and designed specifically for this structure. An example would be the hand driven rivets, which were done to be as accurate as possible. At Oasis Metals, we produce high quality steel gratings and structure support beams like the ones used in the construction of the Sydney Harbour bridge. We take into account your designs, your requirements, and provide you with high quality products that ensure longevity, and stability. Our bottom line is our high rate of client satisfaction, and in this endeavour, we will not waver.

Bonus Fun Fact:

The top of the Sydney Harbour Bridge arch actually rises and falls about 180 mm due to changes in the temperature!

Valyrian Steel

Valyrian Steel

 

Most of the free world and their uncle, across the globe, are currently sitting around discussing outlandish theories about the most prolific television series in the past few years. Game of Thrones. The very mention of the name itself is sometimes enough for perfect strangers to make conversation in order to discuss their opinion on the latest episode, or a particular character.

A central theme we have noticed in the show’s premise is the significance of Valyrian Steel. A mythological metal, it is presented as having mystic properties that allow characters to vanquish certain creatures, apart from being almost a ‘super-metal.’
What interested us the most about the topic was the secrecy behind the smelting of this steel, and the loss of all knowledge on how to create it. Valyrian steel was explained as being the most coveted metal in the lands. Stronger than any other known metal in the show’s universe, it is often shown to be imbued with mythical powers, a bane to the horrors the characters face. Called indestructible, the strength of the metal is a point that the characters keep circling back to ad nauseum.

In the real world, many scholars and archaeologists have drawn on the numerous similarities in properties between Valyrian steel and the historic Damascus steel. The two have many commonalities, namely, the tell tale patterns in the steel, reminiscent of flowing water; the minute differences in the shades of the metal, that make it seem like there are really two metals forged together.

The rarity of it, in the common markets. The loss of the secret behind its creation. Like its real life counterpart, Valyrian steel is primarily used in weapons, although some wealthy patrons commission it for use in crowns, like the former Targaryen king, Aerys, or the Dothraki warrior who carries an arakh, the only one of its kind showcased in the series (so far)

This representation of a different kind of metal with mystical power and legendary strength, is a clear novelty in fiction where magic is usually displayed as spells and trickery. Smoke and mirrors accompanied by much hand waving and chanting. Lightning bolts and thunderous sounds. This is a much colder and harder avatar, pun intended, that captures an audience’s attention because it is a departure from the usual.

Every single Valyrian steel weapon is customized and made to fit certain characteristics of either the house it belongs to, or the wielder of the blade itself. Sometimes those could be one and the same, since most of the blades are heirlooms passed down from one generation to the next. At Oasis metals, we believe that great metal work should be hardy enough to survive the generations, and utilitarian enough to be unaffected by trends or fashions. We customise our gratings and other steel work to suit your needs, and we work to provide you with the best products available on the market.
Contact us to know more.

Steel in Art

Steel in Art

Steel is a superbly malleable metal, and yet is one of the strongest in the world. As diverse and dynamic as it is, it is widely used even in the art world. We posted about the Chicago bean a few weeks ago, and how the structure is a huge tourist attraction. It is seen, touched, and photographed by millions every year, and still manages to weather the elements as well. (Pun intended)

In that same vein, we look at how steel can be molded and interpreted as an artistic medium. When an artist is looking to showcase it’s sheer tenacity in a minimalist design, they could possible do something along the lines of Eddie Robert’s sculpture, like the one depicted below. The flow of the metal, the way it has been molded to seem like an almost effortless arch. The smooth transition from a horizontal pattern to an elegant arch that hovers above it. Seemingly weightless.

And then we have the other end of the spectrum. The GAHR stainless steel coral. A large than life piece – it is intricate and uses a gradient rarely seen in this medium. The smallest details have been brought to life in it. One can almost believe that it truly is a live piece of a coral reef. The rough edges were achieved by treating the steel with a coarse papering to ensure it looks like the reefs that inspired the piece.

The one thing both these pieces have in common is the tenacious and completely multifaceted metal that some of us don’t even realize, impacts our life in the everyday. The dulled polish effect on Robert’s piece, vs the high sheen yet rough appearance of the GAHR scuplture is just a simple focal point in an illustration on how the metal can be molded to suit one’s purposes.

At Oasis Metal, we use the steel to showcase our diverse methods of providing our clients with what they most need. Depending on your individual requirements, we provide custom gratings, with specialised treatments to suit the environments in which they will be used. Whether as an outdoor staircase to highlight a beautiful back garden, or a sturdy frame for step ladders in your factory, we have what you will most need. Reliability. We treat our steel products to be weather proof in the case of your outdoor fixtures. We reinforce them for your warehouses and factories. Most of all, we make sure that you understand that our products are enabled to provide you with peace of mind.

Clouds of Steel – Metal in Artwork and Industry

Clouds of Steel – Metal in Artwork and Industry

The words Stainless Steel immediately conjures up images of large, impersonal structures like construction sites or the equipment used at them. But steel itself is a versatile, and highly useful metal. We’ve seen it’s unbeatable tensile strength in the many industrial projects we’ve used it in, and we’ve seen it used in artwork or other instances we might not have considered at first.

The “Cloud Gate” sculpture in the Millennium Park in Chicago is the first public outdoor work installed in the US by artist Anish Kapoor. The 110 ten elliptical sculpture is also called the ‘Chicago Bean’ and reflects the city’s famous skyline, and the clouds above. Made of a seamless series of highly polished stainless steel plates, the piece is evocative of absolute awe when one sees it for the first time.

cloudgate800

 

The 12 foot high ‘gate’ is a concave chamber underneath it, which allows visitors to get up close and personal with the artwork, and adds a fun element to what could have been just an imposing sight. Visitors can touch the steel and view themselves in different angles, distorting their reflections in strange and funny ways. Inspired by the appearance of liquid mercury, and standing at a height of 33 feet with a length of 66 feet, the structure is among the largest of its kind in the world.

At Oasis Metals, we believe that not everything has to be forced into one single mold. For example while steel gratings seem to have applications restricted to the industrial and construction spaces, they are also easily used by artists or entrepreneurs who have the vision to look outside the box. While gratings are most commonly used in the staircases, covers or other items used in construction, they can also be customised and used in smaller projects like DIY home fixes or refurbishments. Specially treated gratings can be installed for a more solid, safe approach to a treehouse. A child’s playhouse can be reinforced and stabilised with the handrails and ladders we manufacture.

On the other hand, your factory will benefit from the reliability of our stairways and scaffolding, while your mind is at peace because of our reputation for being safety conscious. The quality of our work is judged by the trust our clients place in us because of their own past experiences. They return time and again, because of our penchant for finding what they need, and then meeting and exceeding those expectations.

The possible combinations and permutations for the different gratings we manufacture is highly varied, and gives room for multiple different personalizations. Like with artists, we take the time to stand back and look at the bigger picture. If there is a combination of gratings or orders that would work better for a client, we make sure to research it, and then suggest it to them, backed up with hard data, and clear cut examples of it. Like the Cloud Gate in Chicago, we reflect what we are shown, and change the reflections based on how best it would work in the given situation.